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CINDE Courses Guaranteed to Run
Category: CINDE
Posted: Tue, Sep 19th 2017 at 11:46 AM

Making plans to improve your knowledge in NDT is an important commitment on your part and a course cancellation can disrupt your NDT career. Our goal as Canada’s National NDT Society is to improve the quality and access of education in NDT throughout Canada. At CINDE, courses run as scheduled as long as one attendee is on the course*.

*In the case of an emergency, alternate arrangements will be made or a full refund provided upon request. CINDE makes every effort to ensure scheduled courses run as advertised.

CINDE will not be liable for ancillary expenses such as travel or accommodation arrangements etc. incurred by the student.

https://www.cinde.ca/courses/registration.phtml#guarantee

Hurricane Harvey Relief for Acuren Employees
Category: Industry
Posted: Thu, Sep 7th 2017 at 8:58 AM
As you know, Texas and Louisiana are currently experiencing a state of emergency due to severe flooding. While all of Acuren's employees are safe, they are devastated to confirm that a number of their employees have had severe damage to their homes, vehicles and personal belongings. Acuren is sponsoring a GO Fund me account (see link below) to help Acuren colleagues who have been victimized by the flood.
 
Please consider donating. Every donation will help, no matter how small.
 
New Inspection-Grade Stationary Flood LED UV Lamp for NDT Professionals
Category: Product
Posted: Fri, Sep 22nd 2017 at 10:43 AM
ST700 UV lamp for nondestructive testing solves the biggest challenges in fluorescent UV illumination
 
After consulting with numerous NDT experts and inspectors, Magnaflux is expanding their line of LED UV lamps for non-destructive testing with the ST700 overhead inspection LED UV light, which is specifically designed to eliminate or prevent some of the most common challenges around UV illumination in fluorescent NDT testing.

 “Customers using fluorescent or mercury-vapor solutions today find that they do not have the coverage or intensity that they need to properly and efficiently inspect their parts. They also have to deal with frequent bulb failures, hazardous waste disposal costs, and the swift disappearance of mercury vapor bulb replacements in the market. On the other hand, current LED solutions are often too fragile to stand up to harsh industrial environments, while still not providing the coverage that they require,” explains Sakif Ferdous, Magnaflux Market Research Manager.

Designed and tested by NDT professionals, the ST700 speeds up fluorescent NDT processes while also improving inspection quality with an ultra-wide, 12 x 24 in / 30 x 61 cm UV-A beam when mounted 39 in / 1 m from the inspection surface. The ST700’s best-in-industry UV-A inspection area allows inspectors to quickly examine parts while minimizing part handling, especially with larger test parts, and the high intensity UV illumination helps indications stand out bright and clear for faster detection.

Read more on the Magnaflux website.
Teledyne Cameras Power Award-Winning UAV from University of Toronto Aerospace Team
Category: Industry
Posted: Thu, Sep 14th 2017 at 9:16 AM
University of Toronto Aerospace Team’s (UTAT) customized payload features two Genie camera models for high ground resolutions and fast frame rates, enabled by Teledyne GigE Vision software for Linux
 
Teledyne DALSA, a Teledyne Technologies company and global leader in image sensing technology, congratulates the University of Toronto Aerospace Team’s (UTAT) UAV and Aerial Robotics Divisions on their recent success at Unmanned Systems Canada’s national competition. Both teams were honored with awards for the design and performance of their custom-built unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) which flew autonomous search patterns while capturing images at approximately 200 feet above ground.
 
As a platinum sponsor, Teledyne DALSA provided 2 Genie cameras for the mission. The primary payload, a Genie TS-C4096 provided complete coverage of surveillance regions with high ground resolutions for effective target detection and characterization. A second and lighter weight Genie Nano C1940 model provided high-resolution color imaging from a multirotor. In 2018, both teams plan to deploy the Genie Nano C5100 as their primary imaging payload.
 
Teams were ranked for their ability to accurately report goose population attributes, including the geolocations of detected nests, the number of distinct goose species observed and a census count for each of these species. The UAV and Aerial Robotics Divisions were two of thirteen university student teams to compete in the Flying Phase of the 9th Unmanned Systems Canada UAS Student Competition and placed 2nd and 1st in the design phase and 1st and 4th in flight operations respectively.
 
"We have had great success using Teledyne DALSA Genie cameras for practical applications like target recognition and identification, precision agriculture and wildlife monitoring," commented Erik Chau, team lead for UTAT. "With the recent release of the Linux Gig-E Framework, we are able to acquire high-resolution images at very fast frame rates on an Odroid XU4 running a Ubuntu operating system."
 
Teledyne DALSA is committed to continuing its sponsorship of the University of Toronto Aerospace team in 2018.
Genie camera models feature the industry’s leading SONY and On-Semi CMOS image sensors. A small form actor and multiple resolutions allow Genie Nano cameras to deliver fast frame rates over a GigE Vision or Camera link standard interface, with a broad feature set that includes Teledyne’s own TurboDrive technology and Trigger-to-Image-Reliability. System designers have deployed Genie models in applications from industrial automation to imaging for the entertainment industry.
 
About Teledyne DALSA, Inc.
Teledyne DALSA is an international technology leader in sensing, imaging, and specialized semiconductor fabrication. Our image sensing solutions span the spectrum from infrared through visible to X-ray; our MEMS foundry has earned a world-leading reputation. In addition, through our subsidiaries Teledyne Optech and Teledyne Caris, we deliver advanced 3D survey and geospatial information systems. Headquartered in Waterloo, Canada, Teledyne DALSA employs approximately 1400 employees worldwide. For more information, visit www.teledynedalsa.com.
NOVO 15 Inspector System
Category: Product
Posted: Thu, Sep 14th 2017 at 8:54 AM
The Inspector System is a new, small and lightweight system located in a small Pelican 2700 case. The NOVO 15 Inspector System Contains:

•    NOVO 15 WN Detector inside the ARMOR 15 Protective Case
•    Control Box
•    Panasonic Rugged 10" tablet with NOVO Touch Professional Software
•    Room for Golden XRS-3 Source
•    Wireless & Wire Operation
 
View the NDT Product Line online: https://www.novo-dr.com/ndt-products
Thirty Seconds to Mars Uses FLIR Thermal Cameras in MTV Video Music Awards
Category: Industry
Posted: Thu, Aug 31st 2017 at 2:35 PM

American rock band, Thirty Seconds to Mars, made history Sunday night at the 34th annual MTV Video Music Awards with a live performance of their new single “Walk on Water,” filmed with FLIR’s high-definition (HD) thermal imaging cameras.

Using FLIR’s HD Science Cameras and powered by software from FLIR distributor, MoviTHERM, the Los Angeles based band gave MTV and their fans something they’d never seen before – a display that visualized the heat and energy of the performers using the infrared spectrum.

Thirty Seconds to Mars integrated the FLIR SC8300 and A8303 science cameras, typically used for research and development, into MTV’s broadcast to capture the performance in thermal.

We spoke with Thirty Seconds to Mars lead singer, Jared Leto, about the performance, and why he wanted to leverage FLIR technology for the live MTV performance.

"To be able to bring this idea to life, it took a village, a very large village,” said Jared Leto. “When you do a show like the MTV Awards you have an opportunity to explore and experiment, to revisit the past or to push towards the future. We knew we wanted to do something that hadn't been done before. Playing in total darkness, and capturing our performance via thermal signal and doing it live was complex, challenging and seemingly impossible but with the help of a very patient MTV and an enthusiastic team of creative dreamers, we accomplished our goal. Working with the FLIR team has been inspiring and an absolute pleasure.”

Article via FLIR.

Orphan oil and gas wells adopted by rookie Alberta energy company founder
Category: Industry
Posted: Mon, Aug 28th 2017 at 12:51 PM

CALGARY — Where some see only a jumble of rusted pipes and black tanks jutting from a weed-infested yard in a prairie grain field, Tyler Visscher sees opportunity.

The 31-year-old Red Deer, Alta., electrician is trying to build an oil and gas company the hard way, by scouring the Orphan Well Association’s list of parentless wells in Alberta in hopes of picking out a few winners.

He “adopted” his first well two years ago — bought it, actually — and is now wading through a “whack of paperwork” to buy a second. “Oh, yeah, it’s a gamble for sure,” says the budding oilman. “With everything, there’s a risk, right?”

The crash in commodity prices of the past three years has been linked to a dramatic increase in orphans — oil and gas wells assigned to the OWA because there’s no owner financially able to seal the wells, remove equipment and restore the land when their productive life ends.

In the fiscal year ended March 31, the OWA had 1,391 wells on its list designated for abandonment, up from 768 a year earlier. As of July 6, the list had climbed to 1,438.
That number doesn’t include 1,380 wells the regulator assigned to the OWA in an unprecedented move early this year after owner Lexin Resources was accused of ignoring AER orders and regulations. The former Lexin assets are being marketed as a package by its receiver in a process expected to wrap up this fall.

Many assume orphan wells and related assets are all liability with no value but the Alberta Energy Regulator says that’s not the case. “Recently, many wells, pipelines and facilities have been deemed orphans because their owners have gone bankrupt, despite the fact that they are still capable of producing, transporting or processing oil or gas,” said AER spokesman Ryan Bartlett.
In an effort to place those assets with responsible new owners, the AER has provided a database on the OWA website that gives orphan well locations and history — information designed to attract potential buyers.

“It’s very time-consuming because you have to scour these wells and you have to figure out, ‘OK, why is this well on the list?'” said Visscher. “Was it bad management and the company went bankrupt and now this well is in the orphan well list? Or is the well a poor well? Was it not completed properly? Was it not operated properly? You have to go through, kinda like a detective.”
To take over the well’s production — and responsibility for its environmental liability — the buyer must acquire the underground mineral rights and surface access rights before applying for a licence transfer from the AER.


Not many bother. The AER says the number of licence transfer applications it has handled has increased from four in 2013 to 20 in 2016. Visscher said it took several months to buy his first well east of Calgary. And many hours of work to clean it up after years of neglect. The Crown lease had been returned to the province so he nominated it for public auction and filed the successful bid to buy the mineral rights. He then negotiated an agreement with the landowner, a farmer who hadn’t been paid rent by the previous insolvent owner in four or five years, to gain surface access.

To complete the licence transfer, he then had to pay a $10,000 fee to the OWA. To ensure the wellsite will eventually be reclaimed, he has also had to post a $100,000 bond with the AER.
In all, he says it cost about $50,000 to buy the well which is daily producing some 90,000 cubic feet of natural gas (enough to heat an average single detached home in Canada for one year) plus two barrels of oil. He figures the decade-old well originally cost about $1 million to drill.

Visscher has equipped the well with solar-powered pumps and automated controls designed by his electrical company, Blue Star Electrical, and is using it to demonstrate those products for potential buyers.

He said he’s excited about his second well which is awaiting AER licence transfer. It comes with about 260 hectares of Crown drilling rights which means he will have room to drill more wells if he can find the financial backing to do so.

OWA chairman Brad Herald says “the clock is ticking” for entrepreneurs like Visscher who want to buy orphan wells because a big acceleration in well site cleanups is expected to start this fall. That’s when a $30-million grant announced in the last federal budget is expected to arrive, allowing the province to go ahead with its plan to offer $235 million in loans for OWA projects.

OWA’s annual spending is usually restricted to its $30 million per year industry levy.

Article via EnergyNow

APCNDT 2017 (Nov 13 - 17) Registration Open
Category: Industry
Posted: Mon, Aug 21st 2017 at 8:26 AM

The Non-Destructive Testing Society Singapore (NDTSS) welcomes participants all over the world for the 15th Asia Pacific NDT Conference to be held this November in Singapore. They have over 250 speakers presenting at the conference and 80 International Exhibitors. The Conference is looking forward to a great mixture of participants from all over the world. Please register at the earliest to avoid last minute rush and to reserve your hotel bookings.

Register here

NDTSS us awaiting to host you in Singapore to enjoy the Asian heritage experience.

Metal detection technology key to answering why fair ride broke
Category: Industry
Posted: Fri, Aug 4th 2017 at 1:34 PM

COLUMBUS, Ohio - Inside EWI on the campus of Ohio State, Senior engineer Roger Spencer holds what looks like a clear computer mouse over a solid piece of steel. The Ultra Sound machine, similar to what is used in a hospital can see what the human eye can't. It's what investigators are likely to use to figure out why the Fire Ball ride at the Ohio State Fair snapped killing one person and injuring seven others. Spencer says the machines like this will answer the question why the metal arm of the ride snapped off. "People trained at that can determine where the flaw started was it rapidly and over a long period of time," he said. That's important because Spencer says when steel breaks it can leave a unique signature. "Fatigue cracks are very smooth it would almost be like a machined surface," he said. This metal detective work is called NDT-or non-destructive testing. According to an inspection report on the Fire Ball ride, prior to the accident, inspectors noted NDT was completed. No matter what the investigation finds as the cause, those looking to sue won't be able to collect from the fair. According to the contract between the Fair and Amusement Rides of America, an indemnity clause states "the fair not be held harmless for any claim including death or injury."

Article via 10TV.com

Canadian Institute for Non-destructive Evaluation AGM: A Bright Future Ahead
Category: CINDE
Posted: Wed, Aug 2nd 2017 at 10:09 AM
On June 6th, 2017, the CINDE Board of Directors met along with CINDE Members at the CINDE Annual General Meeting (AGM) to discuss some very important aspects of CINDE’s operations relating to a number of key areas through the year.
 
Kevin Woit (Acuren Group, Inc.) transitioned into his role of Past Chair for CINDE and penned an incredibly positive report on his time as CINDE Chair as well as the future direction of CINDE. During his time as Chair, he was faced with many challenges, but the largest was the decline of the oil and gas industry which the non-destructive testing and inspection industry felt heavily.  Through focussing efforts on the strengths of the staff and organization, CINDE weathered the storm and is poised for growth in the coming year. In his report, he noted, “Some rejuvenation of the training business is visible and I remain very enthusiastic that CINDE is positioned to grow.”  As the Canadian economy continues to recover, CINDE will continue to offer excellent value and quality in all of our activities to the NDT community.
 
As Canada’s non-profit, member organization for the people and companies engaged in NDT, CINDE volunteers to be audited by a third-party every year. The report from the financial auditor noted that there are no inconsistencies and that the statements accurately reflect our operations. CINDE will continue to operate in a transparent manner and continue to serve the NDT industry in an honest and open way.
 
Finally, the CINDE Board of Directors experienced some position and personnel changes.  CINDE welcomed Ed Cabral (Sonatest) to participate as a Director on the Board. Ed is an industry veteran who was already active on the Ontario Chapter Executive who was very interested in helping NDT professionals in Canada engage with CINDE. After many years of service to CINDE and the NDT community, Tim Deagnon (TRD NDT Level 3 Consulting and Training Services) and David Craig (Pratt & Whitney Canada) were required by CINDE Bylaws to retire from the Board after a maximum term time of 8 years. Without the many volunteers who assist CINDE, the organization would not be able to function as strongly as it does. We thank our current and past Directors for their immense support and service to the organization and NDT community.
 
Our Board of Directors for 2017 - 2019 term are:
 
Executive Committee:
•Chairman of the Board: Fulvio Mini (Expertises UberSpec Inc.)
•Vice-Chair, Chair Member Services: Thomas Krause (Royal Military College)
•Vice-Chair, Chair Long Range Planning: Laura Obrutsky
•Secretary-Treasurer: Rick Robichaud (Team Industrial Services Inc.)
•Past Chair: Kevin Woit (Acuren Group, Inc.)

Directors:
•Roy Christensen (Christensen Qualityworks Inc.)
•Michael Connachan (ArcelorMittal Dofasco)
•Heather Kleb (Bruce Power)
•Ed Cabral (Sonatest)
 
We thank all those who were in attendance at the CINDE AGM and look forward to a bigger and better AGM next year!
Jesse Garant Metrology Center is re-defining the future of service based part inspection
Category: Industry
Posted: Tue, Jul 18th 2017 at 8:31 AM

Jesse Garant Metrology Center (USA & Canada) announced that it has expanded its operations to accommodate the growing demand for high volume part inspection for pre-production and production validation. With investments in new equipment and improved infrastructure, including state of the art industrial computed tomography systems for inspecting large parts, their enhanced capabilities solidify their position as leaders within the nondestructive testing and metrology part inspection services industry.


As part of a five year, $15 million roll-out investment in technology, Jesse Garant Metrology Center’s latest expansion includes a more diverse range of advanced imaging systems. The expansion includes a wider range of Industrial CT systems for improved inspection capabilities of industrial parts, digital x-ray systems for high volume part sorting, and new 3D scanning equipment for improved data capture of external features. “Our services are not only to provide our customers with the essential data they need to make qualified decisions, but to help meet the growing demand for larger scale part inspection projects, and continue to be a supporting role in the advancement of industry” says Jesse Garant, President.


With 3 locations within Michigan and Ontario, the company’s centrally located labs primarily serve as an essential hub for the automotive and aerospace industries. Through this investment, the company will continue to be the largest Industrial CT scanning service provider in North America with the greatest diversity of inspection systems available today. “This expansion means we’re able to easily adapt to industry and meet the challenges of part inspection,” adds Garant.


With clients ranging from local businesses to multinational corporations, the company has undergone steady expansion to meet demands from manufacturers around the globe. Last year, Jesse Garant Metrology Center was recognized as the 64th fastest growing business in Canada (2nd in Windsor-Essex) by PROFIT 500 and was also a finalist for Ontario Exporter of the Year.

About Jesse Garant Metrology Center
Jesse Garant Metrology Center is a globally recognized part inspection company, providing NDT and Metrology services using advanced imaging equipment. The company specializes in industrial CT scanning, industrial x-ray, and 3D scanning, with locations in Windsor, ON and Dearborn, MI. For more information, please contact 1-844-JGARANT or visit https://jgarantmc.com.

Creaform Extends NDT Expertise to Aerospace
Category: Industry
Posted: Mon, Jul 10th 2017 at 3:16 PM

The new surface inspection software combined with the HandySCAN 3D is going to reinforce the company’s position as a provider of advanced NDT solutions

Creaform, a worldwide leader in portable and highly accurate 3D measurement solutions and engineering services, announced today that it will extend its expertise in non-destructive testing (NDT) to the aerospace industry. By expanding access to its inspection solutions, the company aims to better enable airlines, as well as maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) service companies, to more efficiently perform the evaluations of in-service aircraft safety, while cutting costs and saving downtime.

"As predictive maintenance becomes more prominent, aviation maintenance professionals and aircraft MRO providers are increasingly on the lookout for innovative methods that enable quicker and safer decisions to be made on the outcome of part defects," says Steeves Roy, NDT Product Manager at Creaform. "The mapping of external surface defects on aircraft parts, which can prove difficult to obtain using traditional methods—namely hail damage, bird impacts and lightning strikes on the fuselage and wings—can be assessed with 3D scanning. When paired with advanced inspection tools, such solution cuts down on the operator’s impact on measurements, shortens time to get the final report, and reinforces decision-making."

To ensure that the solution matches aviation maintenance industry requirements and properly reflects the market needs, Creaform is partnering with major aircraft manufacturers for beta testing. The surface inspection solution dedicated to aerospace applications is set for release in October 2017.

Earlier this year, Creaform announced that the HandySCAN 3D metrology-grade laser scanner had made its first major step into the aerospace industry. It was added to the Airbus Technical Equipment Manual (TEM) which is referenced in the Airbus Structure Repair Manual (SRM).

Well-known for its NDT solutions for the oil and gas industry, Creaform’s NDT product solution is comprised of its flagship HandySCAN 3D™ portable metrology-grade 3D scanner and its Pipecheck™ NDT software, both of which allow automatic on-site inspection, detection, and characterization of pipeline defects. With traceable and repeatable inspection data and results, operators can access critical information for making safer decisions.

Article via Creaform 3D website.

New Olympus Ultra-Portable EPOCH® 6LT Flaw Detector Provides Comprehensive Flaw Detection Capabilities for Rope Access and High Portability Inspections
Category: Product
Posted: Mon, Jul 10th 2017 at 11:08 AM

Optimized for single-handed operation, the EPOCH 6LT flaw detector combines a leading-edge ergonomic design with powerful ultrasonic functionality in an instrument built specifically for rope access and high portability applications.

The design of the EPOCH 6LT flaw detector, from form factor to the user interface, is optimized for user comfort, making it easy to use with one hand, so rope access inspection technicians and users that require high portability can do their work comfortably and efficiently.

•    Fits securely in one hand with minimal wrist fatigue: weighs just 1.95 lbs (890 g) with a grip-oriented weight distribution
•    Attaches to a user’s leg or harness: rope access technicians can secure the instrument for hands-free operation
•    Users can navigate the menu using just their thumb: the rotary knob and simple button design make it easy to navigate through the UI, even while wearing gloves
•    Durable and reliable: engineered to IP65/67 for dust and water resistance and drop tested to protect against the hazards found in challenging inspection environments

Learn more online on the Olympus website.

 

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